Brian Cashman is rappelling down a building again

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UPDATE: That was quick. According to the Associated Press, Bobby V has already accepted Cashman’s challenge. Next December, it’s on.

8:14 AM: Brian Cashman rappelled down a 22-story building in Stamford, Connecticut last year for that city’s “Heights and Lights” ceremony.  He’s doing it again as I speak.

One would think that this is highly dangerous business. I mean, if that city had a public safety official with any kind of stature, he’s put an end to it this instant!  Someone, tell me!  Who is Stamford’s Director of Public Safety?!

Oh, wait.  I see your game, Valentine.  I see your game.

Anyway, Cashman took the opportunity this morning to have fun with it. Before he went over the edge he — seriously — publicly challenged Stamford’s own Bobby V. to join him next year.

“You go first.”

“No,  you.”

“I insist.”

[shove]

Yankees-Red Sox, baby.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.