Brian Tallet was a victim of check forgery in St. Louis

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According to Marlon A. Walker of the Post-Dispatch, a man in St. Louis was arrested this summer for attempting to cash a $2,000 check on a Regions Bank account belonging to left-handed reliever Brian Tallet and his wife Natalie.

Tallet posted a rough 8.31 ERA and 10/7 K/BB ratio in 13 1/3 innings for the Cardinals this past season before being shipped to Toronto in a late-July trade involving young center fielder Colby Rasmus.

The man, a 21-year-old James Deal Cole, was charged with one count of forgery. Here’s more from the Post-Dispatch:

Cole told authorities he had been approached by a man in a landscaping company truck while begging for money in St. Louis. The man, who Cole said identified himself as Brian Tallet, wrote Cole a check and offered him a job doing some landscaping work over the summer. Cole said the man wrote a $2,000 check, telling Cole to keep $1,500 and give the other $500 back.

Brian Tallet, who finished the 2011 season in Toronto and is now a free agent, told authorities he never met Cole, nor did he hire the man for work.

Poor effort, fellas. Tallet, 34, is a free agent this winter. He’s likely seeking a minor league contract.

Kirk Gibson home run happened 30 years ago

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With the Dodgers trying to make it back to the World Series for the second year in a row — and trying to win it for the first time in 30 years — it’s worth looking back at the last time they won it. More specifically, it’s worth looking back at the signature moment from the last time they won it. Which, really, was one of baseball’s all-time signature moments.

Yep, I’m talking about Kirk Gibson’s famous game-winning home run off of Dennis Eckersley of the Oakland Athletics in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, which happened 30 years ago tonight.

All playoff magic for anyone too young to remember Bill Mazeroski’s homer in 1960 is measured against Gibson taking Dennis Eckersley downtown to turn a 4-3 deficit into a 5-4 win. Heck, even if you were around in 1960, it’s far less likely that you saw Mazeroski’s homer than it was for you to have seen Gibson’s. Nationally broadcast in prime time to a nation of millions who had not yet fragmented into viewers of hundreds of obscure cable channels and various forms of streaming entertainments, it was a moment that sent shockwaves through the world of sports.

For my part, I was fifteen years-old, sitting in my living room in Beckley, West Virginia watching it as it happened. Like most of the rest of the country, I was convinced that the Dodgers had no chance to beat the mighty Bash Brothers and the 104-win Oakland A’s. Especially given that the Dodgers’ leader, MVP-to-be Gibson, was hobbled and not starting. Even when he was called on to pinch hit, I had no faith that he’d be able to touch Eckersley, the best relief pitcher on the planet, let alone hit the ball with any kind of authority.

But, as Vin said when he called it, the Dodgers’ year was so improbable that, in hindsight, it made perfect sense for Gibson to have done the impossible: