Tossup Alert: The AL MVP to be announced at 2pm Eastern

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Today the BBWAA will give out the only award that looks to have any kind of intrigue or potential controversy to it: AL MVP.

This year’s award throws a couple of time-tested argument starters out there: should a pitcher win the MVP?  Should the MVP winner come from a team that didn’t go anywhere? Is year-long excellence somehow less impressive for MVP purposes than a guy who has a late dominant surge that carries a team into the playoffs?  And what if that late surge couldn’t quite do it because all of that guy’s teammates were eating fried chicken and drinking beer?

Justin Verlander, Jose Bautista, Miguel Cabrera, Curtis Granderson and Jacoby Ellsbury all fall into that matrix somewhere.  I have no freaking clue how it will break down.  My gut tells me that Verlander will get it. Why? Because I imagine that when the Sox crapped out on the last day of the season Ellsbury lost support and that those people — storyline voters, I’ll call them, who wanted to give it to him on the theory that he was carrying Boston into the playoffs — will defect to Verlander in greater numbers than Bautista.

And yes, that’s not far removed from me just pulling it all out of my butt. Cut me some slack. I’m a little tired this morning.

One thing I’m more sure about:  anyone who throws a fit about the MVP voting this year is just trying to start a fight because they’re bored. It’s OK, I do that all the time, but it’s hard to see oodles of daylight between these candidates in my view. I’d probably vote for Bautista, and I’ll get a little miffed if Verlander doesn’t win due to people simply leaving him off their ballots entirely, but there just doesn’t seem to be any room to call whatever results we get an atrocity.

Adjust your rage accordingly.

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.