Mark Cuban doesn’t want to buy the Braves. Drat.

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Being a Braves fan was its most fun when a potentially-crazy billionaire owned them. We won’t get a second go-around of that, however, because Mark Cuban told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution yesterday that he has no interest in buying the team.

Now, the Braves aren’t for sale, but that doesn’t mean this is a wholly academic exercise.  The team’s current owner — Liberty Media — may very well look to move the team soon because of the terms of the deal it made with Time-Warner when it bought the team four years ago, requiring that they keep the team until the current collective bargaining agreement expires, and that’s in a couple of weeks. There are some tax consequences to it all too.  And given that the very purchase of the team seemed to be driven by some sort of corporate financial calculation rather than any animate feelings for baseball, it’s not like Liberty has any kind of real attachment to the Bravos.

But back to Cuban: he told Dave O’Brien of the AJC that he prefers “franchises that need a lot of help,” and that “the Braves have a great franchise.” And that means that he wouldn’t be interested if the team was put on the market.

Crap.  Anyone know any other potentially-crazy billionaires?  Miss you.

MLB and MLBPA announce first set of COVID-19 test results

MLB COVID-19 test results
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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On Friday evening, Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association announced the first set of results for COVID-19 testing as part of the mandatory intake screening process under MLB’s COVID-19 Health Monitoring & Testing Plan. Per Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle, the Athletics are not part of this data because their testing has not yet been completed.

There were 38 positive tests, accounting for 1.2% of the 3,185 samples collected and tested. 31 of the 38 individuals who tested positive are players. 19 different teams had one or more individuals test positive.

Sports Illustrated’s Emma Baccellieri notes that the positive test rate in the U.S. nationally is 8.3 percent. The NBA’s positive test rate was 7.1 percent. MLB’s positive test rate is well below average. This doesn’t necessarily mean that anything is wrong with MLB’s testing or that it’s an atypical round of testing. Rather, MLB’s testing population may more closely represent the U.S. population as a whole. Currently, because testing is still somewhat limited, those who have taken tests have tended to be those exhibiting symptoms or those who have been around others who have tested positive. If every single person in the U.S. took a test, the positive test rate would likely come in at a much lower number.

Several players who tested positive have given their consent for their identities to be made known. Those are: Delino DeShields (link), Brett Martin (link), Edward Colina, Nick Gordon, and Willians Astudillo (link). Additionally, Red Sox lefty Eduardo Rodríguez has not shown up to Red Sox camp yet because he has been around someone who tested positive, per The Athletic’s Jen McCaffrey.