Ron Santo is back on the Hall of Fame ballot

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After getting totally boned by the Hall of Fame for decades, Ron Santo will once again be up for consideration as part of the new-look Veterans Committee process.

At this year’s Winter Meetings Santo — and 10 other former players — will be up for votes as part of the “Golden Era” slate of candidates (there are now three eras which get considered in turn every three years). The other nine: Minnie Minoso, Buzzie Bavasi, Jim Katt, Allie Reynolds, Ken Boyer, Luis Tiant, Charlie O. Finley, Gil Hodges and Tony Oliva.

Of that crowd I think Santo and Minoso belong.  Of course, I won’t have any confidence in the Veterans Committee — new look or otherwise — until they get it right for once.  For years and years it let way too many unworthy guys in and then, in an overreaction, for too long passed over worthy candidates.

Put in Santo and Minoso, folks.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.