Let’s watch someone convince himself that Wilson Valdez isn’t a falloff from Jimmy Rollins

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I don’t know if Jimmy Rollins is going to stay in Philly. I kind of think he will because it’s a great match and I have a hard time envisioning a world in which he isn’t wearing red pinstripes. But I do know this much: if he leaves the Phillies, the team would be way worse off if they decided to make Wilson Valdez their everyday shortstop.

Not that you’d know it from reading this blog post from Bob Vertone at Philly.com today:

The Phils had a better record over the last two seasons when Valdez started at shortstop than when Rollins did. Even if you throw out the seven games Rollins started during the eight-game “hangover” this season, his win percentage (.622) is lower …

Because as we all know, the only thing that impacted any of those games was the presence of Wilson Valdez and the absence of Jimmy Rollins. Nothin’ else was going on. At all.

Beyond that, Vertone tries to make a case that the differences between Valdez and Rollins aren’t all that great. Which is quite a trick when you realize that Rollins has an OPS+ of 97 in over 7500 career plate appearances while Valdez has an OPS+ of 67 in just over 1000.  And that Rollins is still a damn solid shortstop. And that Valdez is himself turns 34 next season.

Rollins may play someplace else in 2012. If he does, you can bet your bippy that the Phillies are going to look for a replacement for him who is better than Valdez. Or, if they don’t, they’ll know that they’ll have a big falloff at short that they’ll have to make up elsewhere.

Of course, as the pic reveals, Valdez is versatile. Maybe he can help out in the pen.

Marcus Stroman: José Bautista could ‘easily’ pitch in MLB bullpen

José Bautista and Marcus Stroman
Scott Cunningham/Getty Images
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José Bautista hasn’t appeared in the majors since 2018 but the 39-year-old isn’t done playing just yet. Last month, we learned via a report from ESPN’s Jeff Passan that Bautista is hoping to come back as a two-way player. He spent the winter working out as a pitcher.

Bautista had also been working with former Blue Jays teammate Marcus Stroman. Back in January, Stroman tweeted, “My bro @JoeyBats19 is nasty on the mound. We been working working. All jokes aside, this man can pitch in a big league bullpen. I’ll put my word on it!”

In March, Passan added some details about Bautista, writing, “I’ve seen video of Jose Bautista throwing a bullpen session. Couldn’t tell the velocity, but one source said he can run his fastball up to 94. His slider had legitimate tilt — threw a short one and a bigger bender. @STR0 said in January he could pitch in a big league bullpen.” Stroman retweeted it, adding, “Facts!”

Stroman reiterated his feelings on Tuesday. He tweeted, “Since y’all thought I wasn’t being serious when I said it the first time…my bro @JoeyBats19could EASILY pitch in a big league bullpen. Easily. Sinker, slider, and changeup are MLB ready!” Stroman attached a video of Bautista throwing a slider, in which one can hear Stroman calling the pitch “nasty.”

Stroman attached another video of Bautista throwing a glove-side sinker:

Replying to a fan, Stroman said Bautista’s body “is in better shape than 90-95% of the league.”

I am not a scout and won’t pretend to be one after watching two low-resolution videos. And Stroman’s hype is likely partially one friend attempting to uplift another. That being said, I’ve seen much worse from position players attempting to pitch. It’s a long shot, especially given his age, that Bautista will ever pitch in the majors, but it wouldn’t be surprising to see him get an opportunity to pitch in front of major league scouts.