Cubs fire Mike Quade, already ruling out Ryne Sandberg?

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Mike Quade is out as Cubs manager after meeting last week with new team president Theo Epstein to essentially interview for his own job.

Epstein called it “a productive conversation” and Quade is under contract for $980,000 in 2012, but not surprisingly the new regime wants to bring in their own guy.

Ryne Sandberg’s name will no doubt be linked to the job, but in making the Quade announcement Epstein said that the Cubs’ next manager “must have managerial or coaching experience at the major league level.” That seemingly rules out Sandberg, who’s struggled to land a prominent spot on a big-league coaching staff, let alone a managerial gig.

Quade took over as interim manager in late 2010 after Lou Piniella stepped down and worked his way into the full-time job thanks to the Cubs going 24-13 down the stretch. None of that same magic was present this season, as the Cubs finished 71-91.

UPDATE: Sandberg might have to settle for the Cardinals job, which would be … interesting.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.