Indians bring back Fausto Carmona, cut loose Grady Sizemore

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Fausto Carmona will stay with Cleveland in 2012 after the team exercised his $7 million option, but the Indians made Grady Sizemore a free agent by choosing a $500,000 buyout rather than pay him $8.5 million following another injury wrecked season.

Once upon a time Sizemore was one of the best young players in baseball and the Indians’ biggest long-term building block, but he hasn’t been productive since 2009 and hasn’t been healthy and productive since 2008.

During the past two seasons he’s missed 220 of a possible 324 games while hitting just .220 with a .659 OPS and knee injuries cast some doubt on his ability to be an asset in center field at age 29. I’ll be interesting to see if any teams are willing to risk offering him more than a one-year deal, because had Sizemore been a free agent a few years ago $100 million offers would’ve piled up.

Carmona failed to build on a strong 2010, going 7-15 with a 5.25 ERA in 32 starts, but the Indians aren’t ready to cut ties with the 28-year-old right-hander and he’d likely have had little trouble securing a multi-year deal on the open market.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.