Derek Lowe traded to the Indians

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We weren’t expecting that.

Jon Heyman reports that the Braves have traded Derek Lowe to the Cleveland Indians. Buster Olney says that the Braves will eat $10 million of the $15 million left on Lowe’s contract and that the Indians will send back “second tier” player(s) in return. UPDATE: The player going from Cleveland to Atlanta is left handed reliever Chris Jones. No, I dunno either.

Lowe had a horrendous 2011 season, going 9-17 with a 5.05 ERA and a WHIP of 1.508, though there is some suggestion that he was a touch better than that record and ERA would lead you to believe. Still, he’s not been good and he’s in a downward trajectory, as a good late run in 2010 helped salvage what, to that point, had been an equally suspect season.

It would appear that the best thing Lowe has going for him right now is durability, in that he’s made at least 32 starts a year for a solid decade. Which, while not nothing, is not much to pin one’s hopes on. Lowe will turn 39 on June 1st, after all, so you can’t really count on him having too many more bounceback seasons, can you?

That said, for the Indians, a $5 million gamble is not a terrible one. For the Braves, not having Derek Lowe throw actual pitches in baseball games and saving $5 million is pretty OK under the circumstances too.  So, while it’s too much to call this “win-win” we can probably call it “not-lose-not-lose.”

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.