Stop bashing the Dodgers for “blaming” Bryan Stow for his injuries

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There has been a minor uproar today since it was reported that the Dodgers, in the context of the civil suit arising out of the Bryan Stow beating, will ask the jury to assign percentages of the blame to the assailants, the Dodgers … and to Bryan Stow himself.  The tenor of the uproar:  “Oh my God, the DODGERS ARE BLAMING THE VICTIM!”

Back off the ledge, people.  This is standard. It is part of any litigation involving injuries. Your indignation at the Dodgers may feel righteous, but it is misplaced.

To be sure, it’s not entirely misplaced.  The attorney who was quoted — Jerome Jackson — put it in a way that could have been a tad more callous if he put effort into it, but not terribly more so:

“You’re saying to the jury, ‘They (the Stow family) are saying we’re 100 percent liable. But does that mean (Marvin) Norwood and (Louis) Sanchez, who beat this guy up, have no liability? And, does it mean Mr. Stow himself has no liability? … I’ve been doing these cases for 23 years and I have never seen one yet in which it didn’t take at least two people to tango.”

Not the way I would have phrased it. There’s no need to say that kind of thing in that kind of off the cuff manner.  But he’s also not wrong.

California is a comparative negligence state.  What that means is, in personal injury cases in California, the jury is required to determine responsibility and damages based on the negligence of every party directly involved in the accident.

The classic case: a car accident in which one driver is speeding, the other driver fails to signal and turns in front of the speeder (whose speed he has misjudged) and an accident happens. Both parties contributed to the accident, and the jury assigns percentages of the blame. Let’s say that the speeder was 49% responsible and the turner was 51%.

Is it fair for the one who was 49% responsible to recover 100% of the damages from the one who was 51% responsible? Because that’s how the law used to be everywhere. One is right one is wrong and it’s all or nothing. People understandably had a problem with this, so most states now allow recovery based on those percentages.

Applied to the Stow case, it’s not inconceivable that a jury — once it hears the evidence — could conclude that, in fact, Bryan Stow contributed, say, 5% to the incident. How? Well, remember that video of Stow taunting Dodgers fans?  While we may all conclude that taunting is no excuse for a beating — I certainly believe that — a jury will be tasked with making its own determination of that. And of any other evidence that we don’t currently know about. They will be asked to make that impartial judgment. They could decide that Stow was 0%. They could decide it was 5%. They could decide 25%.

But the point is, no matter how unseemly is may feel to “blame the victim” as it were, the law allows the jury to decide it. And if the jury is allowed to decide it, and there is any chance that because of it the Dodgers’ liability could be reduced, the lawyer for the Dodgers is absolutely obligated to raise it. It would be legal malpractice for him not to.

If you hate this, take up your argument with the legislature who made California a comparative negligence state. Or take your argument up with the jury if and when it decides to blame the victim.  But don’t take it out on the Dodgers. And don’t take it out on the  lawyer. The man — while not exactly the most thoughtful speaker in the world — is just doin’ his job.

Report: Yankees acquire James Paxton from the Mariners

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Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reports that the Yankees have acquired starter James Paxton from the Mariners. Corey Brock of The Athletic reports that the Mariners will be receiving three prospects from the Yankees: pitcher Justus Sheffield, outfielder Dom Thompson-Williams, and pitcher Erik Swanson.

Paxton, 30, has been among the game’s better starters over the past few years. In 2018, he went 11-6 with a 3.76 ERA and a 208/42 K/BB ratio in 160 1/3 innings. The lefty has two more years of arbitration eligibility remaining after earning $4.9 million this past season.

Sheffield, 22, is the headliner in the Mariners’ return. He made his major league debut in September for the Yankees, pitching 2 2/3 innings across three appearances. Two of those appearances were scoreless; in the third, he gave up a three-run home run to J.D. Martinez, certainly not an uncommon result among pitchers. MLB Pipeline rates Sheffield as the Yankees’ No. 1 prospect and No. 31 overall in baseball.

Thompson-Williams, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the fifth round of the 2016 draft. This past season, between Single-A Charleston and High-A Tampa, he hit .299/.363/.546 with 22 home runs, 74 RBI, 63 runs scored, and 20 stolen bases in 415 plate appearances. He was not among the Yankees’ top-30 prospects, per MLB Pipeline.

Swanson, 25, was selected by the Yankees in the eighth round of the 2014 draft. He spent most of his 2018 campaign between Double-A Trenton and Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Overall, he posted a 2.66 ERA with a 139/29 K/BB ratio in 121 2/3 innings. MLB Pipeline rated him No. 22 in the Yankees’ system.

This trade comes as no surprise as the Yankees clearly wanted to upgrade the starting rotation and the Mariners seemed motivated to trade Paxton this offseason. To the Mariners’ credit, they got a good return for Paxton, as Sheffield likely becomes the organization’s No. 1 prospect. The only worry about this trade for the Yankees is how Paxton will fare in the more hitter-friendly confines of Yankee Stadium compared to the spacious Safeco Field. The Yankees are likely not done adding, however. Expect even more new faces before the start of spring training.