Mike Scioscia gets defensive about the Mike Napoli trade

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Mike Napoli continuing his spectacular season in the playoffs has led to the Angels being criticized for trading him in a deal for Vernon Wells and manager Mike Scioscia being criticized for never being the biggest Napoli fan.

Scioscia got defensive when that topic was raised during a radio interview yesterday, saying:

We did not butt heads, that’s absolutely false. Mike had to work on stuff that didn’t come naturally to him, more so than other catchers who maybe do it more naturally. … I think we have to wait a couple years first. Right now, it’s obvious. Mike Napoli is having an incredible run with Texas. He was certainly capable of doing what he did and we valued him. The thing that cracks me up is when people say we didn’t think he was any good. We played him a lot more than Texas has this year over his career with us.

Napoli, of course, had a much different take on his time with Scioscia and the Angels, telling the Dallas Morning News earlier this season:

I always felt like I was looking over my shoulder to see if I was doing things right. I had “bad hands.” I was so worried about my setup and the mechanics all the time. I learned a lot. I learned a lot of what I do there, but playing there just wasn’t much fun.

Scioscia often preferred Jeff Mathis’ inept bat and good glove over Napoli’s slugging, and while some of what the manager says about Napoli’s time with the Angels is surely true there’s no getting around that fact. Now that the Angels have parted ways with general manager Tony Reagins there are tons of reports about how Scioscia has really been running things for years and the perception–right or wrong–that he helped push Napoli out of town isn’t going away any time soon.

Attempting to complete cycle, Robinson Chirinos thrown out to end game

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With his Astros trailing the Tigers 2-1, catcher Robinson Chirinos began his at-bat in the bottom of the ninth a triple shy of the cycle. He doubled in the second inning, singled in the fourth, and hit a solo homer in the seventh. Yordan Álvarez and Yuli Gurriel both struck out, leaving the Astros’ fate in the hands of Chirinos against Joe Jiménez. After working the count to 2-1, Chirinos slapped an 85 MPH slider to the gap in right-center field. A diving Travis Demeritte could not come up with the ball, but center fielder Harold Castro fired the ball back in to Gordon Beckham, who then made a perfect throw to Dawel Lugo at third base. Chirinos was tagged out for the final out of the game. No triple, no cycle. The Astros lost 2-1.

Chirinos was attempting to become the first Astro to hit for the cycle since Brandon Barnes on July 19, 2013 against the Mariners.

The Astros entered Wednesday’s game as the largest favorite in 15 seasons, according to ESPN’s David Purdum. The Astros were -500 per Caesars Sportsbook. Other sportsbooks had them at -550. So the Tigers’ win was quite the upset.

Justin Verlander went the distance in the loss. The only blemishes on his line were solo homers to Ronny Rodríguez in the fifth and John Hicks in the ninth. They were the only hits he allowed while walking none and striking out 11.