We have a classic on our hands

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When do you know that a classic World Series is afoot? We certainly know it when it’s over. But at what point as it’s happening can one safely say that, yes, we’re seeing something special? The kind of series that only comes along once or twice a decade? Something memorable?

I’m prepared to say that we have one now.  With the Rangers’ 4-0 win over the Cardinals we now have played four games, and nothing has been decided.  We’ve had a solid outing from Chris Carpenter in Game 1 paired with a clutch pinch hit. We had a a ninth inning comeback in Game 2. We had one of the best — possibly the best — single offensive performance by a player in a World Series game from Albert Pujols in Game 3. And now, in Game 4, a gem from Derek Holland.

Are you not entertained? What else could you ask for? And we have at least two more games to play.

Holland was masterful tonight, mixing the best velocity he’s shown in three postseason starts with a curve ball that obeyed his every command. Twenty-four hours after the Cardinals bats made mincemeat of everything tossed their way, they had no answers for Holland. He gave up two hits, both to Lance Berkman. There was never a threat until the ninth, and that was aided by Neftali Feliz who came in and walked the first batter he faced after Holland ran out of gas.  Just ask Tony La Russa and Ron Washington how dominant Holland was. First La Russa:

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And then Washington:

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But this World Series is about more than Derek Holland. Or Albert Pujols. Or Jason Motte. Or Chris Carpenter. It’s building in much the same way an individual game builds. Each night, we’ve seen something wonderful yet something totally different than we saw the game before.  At this rate Game 5 is going to turn on a triple play. Or a steal of home. Or the hidden ball trick.

Or maybe something else entirely. All I know is that neither the Rangers nor the Cardinals seem to have mailing-one-in on their agenda. And each time we think we know what may happen — the bullpens dominating, continued pitchers duels, or offensive outbursts — someone comes along the very next game and flips the script.

Predicting what happens next is a sucker’s game at this point. It’s been some time since we’ve had four straight World Series games this much fun for so many different reasons. We’ve all bought the ticket. Time to just sit back and take the ride.

Noah Syndergaard: ‘I feel like I’m going to bet (on) myself in free agency’

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Yankees starter Luis Severino and Phillies starter Aaron Nola both signed contract extensions within the last week. Severino agreed to a four-year, $40 million contract with a 2023 club option. Nola inked a four-year, $45 million deal with a 2023 club option.

While the deals both represented significant raises and longer-term financial security for the right-handed duo, some feel like the players are selling themselves short. It has become a more common practice for players to agree to these types of deals in part due to how stagnant free agency has become. Get the money while you can.

Mets starter Noah Syndergaard is in a similar situation as Severino and Nola were. He and the Mets avoided arbitration last month, agreeing on a $6 million salary for the 2019 season. He has two more years of arbitration eligibility left. A contract extension with the Mets would presumably cover both of those years plus two or three years of what would be free agent years. As Tim Britton of The Athletic reports, however, Syndergaard plans to test free agency when the time comes.

Syndergaard said, “I trust my ability and the talent that I have. So I feel like I’m going to bet (on) myself in free agency and not do what they did. But if it’s fair for both sides and they approach me on it, then maybe we can talk.” He clarified that he would be open to a conversation about an extension, but the Mets thus far haven’t approached him about it. In his words, “There’s been no traction.”

Syndergaard, 26, has been one of baseball’s better starters since debuting in 2015. He owns a career 2.93 ERA with 573 strikeouts and 116 walks in 518 1/3 innings. Among pitchers to have logged at least 400 innings since 2015 and post a lower ERA are Clayton Kershaw (2.22), Jacob deGrom (2.66) and Max Scherzer (2.71). Syndergaard made only seven starts in 2017 yet still ranks seventh among pitchers in total strikeouts since 2015.

If Sydergaard doesn’t end up signing an extension, he will be entering free agency after the 2021 season. The collective bargaining agreement expires in December 2021 and a new one will likely be agreed upon around that time. Syndergaard will hopefully have better prospects entering free agency then than players do now.