Beer in the clubhouse and the dugout? In Yankee Stadium? Yes!

39 Comments

The beer drinkers in Boston? Amateurs. Pikers. For real beer drinking, you gotta read this New York Daily News story about the Yankees, based on reports from “insiders”:

According to one of the insiders, Jason Giambi and Roger Clemens would routinely drink beer on the dugout bench when they played for the Yankees, passing back and forth what Giambi called his “protein shake,” code for a cup of beer, the source said. And they weren’t the only ones who partook. “Rally beers are big in the clubhouse,” one insider said. “Guys would drink them all the time, on the bench, in the clubhouse, in the training room. It’s common.”

But you gotta take all of that with a grain of hops, because the next anecdote quoted from this source — about Jose Canseco hitting three homers on beer-power while with the Yankees — was debunked by ESPN’s David Schoenfield earlier today.

My guess: the story is largely true — ballplayers like beer and will drink it whenever — even if the details are exaggerated for dramatic effect.  Which makes it like most Daily News stories, most likely.

Either way, I continue to not be shocked by any of the allegations that come out of Boston. And continue to not think any of them are that big a deal.

Report: Major League Baseball bans transactions with Mexican League teams

Getty Images
6 Comments

Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reports that Major League Baseball has banned all transactions with Liga Mexicana de Beisbol (LMB), popularly known as the Mexican League. As of now, all 30 teams are prohibited from signing players under contract with LMB teams. The ban was issued due to Major League Baseball’s contention that “corruption” and “fraud” run rampant in the player acquisition process.

Passan describes the issues in detail, and they sound pretty compelling. The upshot: LMB clubs — which have full control over their players — are taking advantage of them, taking most if not all of the signing bonuses MLB teams give them after negotiating for their rights. Mexican teams often sign players when they’re 15 years-old so that, once they are old enough for American teams to approach them, they’re in the position to take a usurious cut.

Passan says Major League Baseball is demanding greater transparency from LMB before it’s willing to lift the ban. He also says that the MLBPA is in “lockstep” with Major League Baseball on the matter, which makes sense given that, if MLB’s claims are accurate, players are being exploited here. He also says that if LMB does not change its ways, there is a “Plan B,” though it’s not clear what that is.

There aren’t a ton of Mexican players signed by MLB teams each year, but there are enough to make this a significant issue that is worth watching.