Bud Selig wants the Theo Epstein stuff done before the World Series starts. But he shouldn’t care.

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We keep hearing that the Red Sox and the Cubs are continuing to negotiate a compensation deal for the Cubs’ hiring Theo Epstein, but according to Buster Olney, Bud Selig wants this stuff wrapped up before the World Series starts on Wednesday so it doesn’t distract from baseball’s big show.

I get his concern because that’s the sort of thing baseball commissioners are always concerned about, but that whole “it distracts from the World Series spotlight” notion seems like an antiquated one.  It’s not like it was 25 years ago when the baseball press was only able to handle one big baseball story a day due to column inches and travel and communication limitations and stuff.  Fifteen things can happen on the same day and they’ll all get covered.

No one who is predisposed to watch the World Series is going to avoid it because of a story about negotiations over an executive. And let’s be honest: baseball is a local game: people in Chicago care way more about Theo Epstein and the Cubs than the World Series. Especially when the World Series involves the hated Cardinals.

Embrace the cacophony, Bud.  People talking about baseball, no matter the subject, is a good thing.  We can handle more than one thing going on at once.

Report: White Sox discussing trade for Joc Pederson

Joc Pederson
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A number of teams are making calls about Dodgers outfielder Joc Pederson these days, as is the general nature of the offseason. Per Jason Kinander of FanSided, there have been some preliminary trade discussions between the Dodgers and the White Sox, though a formal deal doesn’t appear imminent and any potential competition from other clubs is still unknown.

Pederson, 26, has enjoyed quite a run with the Dodgers over the last five years. A perennial 25-home run hitter (when healthy), he slashed .248/.321/.522 with 56 RBI, an .843 OPS, and 2.7 fWAR through 443 plate appearances during the 2018 regular season. Following the Dodgers’ unsuccessful postseason campaign, Pederson agreed to a one-year, $5 million contract in advance of the arbitration deadline, and is currently slated to remain under team control through the 2020 season.

Despite his relative affordability and clear value to the club, shedding Pederson from their roster would allow the Dodgers to pursue the kind of right-handed hitters they need to balance out their 2019 lineup. It’s not certain what the White Sox are prepared to give up, but Kinander mentions right-hander Carson Fulmer, lefty reliever Aaron Bummer, and recent draft pick/third baseman Bryce Bush as a few possibilities.