Red Sox owner John Henry: “I personally opposed” signing Carl Crawford

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During a radio appearance on 98.5 “The Sports Hub” in Boston this afternoon Red Sox owner John Henry explained that he “personally opposed” the team’s decision to sign free agent Carl Crawford to a seven-year, $142 million contract last offseason.

Henry said that he ultimately deferred to general manager Theo Epstein and the front office decision-makers, adding:

We had plenty of left-handed hitting. I don’t have to go into why. I’ll just tell you that at the time I opposed the deal, but I don’t meddle to the point of making decisions for our baseball team.

Which is how an owner should be, although going on the radio to say you opposed a $142 million decision by the GM who just happens to be on his way out of town seems a little shady considering how various unsavory details about Terry Francona’s tenure magically appeared as soon as he was no longer the manager.

On the other hand, at the time of the Crawford signing Epstein did say that he had to talk ownership into the move and Henry also said during the same interview today that “I would have loved for Theo to be our GM for the next 20 years … I did everything I could personally to make that happen.”

And then when it didn’t happen, he went on radio to distance himself and the team from one of Epstein’s biggest moves, which seems to be the Red Sox’s modus operandi when it comes to longtime employees leaving the organization. Oh, and surely Crawford will love hearing about how the owner of the team he’s signed with through 2017 didn’t want him in the first place.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.