How to fix the Red Sox

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Gordon Edes of ESPN Boston has a good column up about what the Red Sox should do this winter and into next season.  I take issue with the headline — “Sounds crazy, but the Red Sox can be saved” — because, dude, they still won 90 frickin’ games and are insanely talented. It’s not like they require super human efforts here. It’d be way crazier to suggest that some beer, fried chicken and a late-season skid suddenly turned these guys into the Chicago Cubs.

But there are a lot of intriguing ideas in the mix. One of them: make Daniel Bard a starter.  Which, sure, is something he did when he first came into the Sox organization. Except he was horrendous in that role, walking guys like he was paid to do it and striking guys out at a rate less than half of what he’d go on to do as a reliever. I suppose stranger things have happened, but I could never see the Sox making Bard a starter now.

But yeah, some of the other stuff — such as giving Carl Crawford a set place in the lineup and leaving him alone — is good.  Most important of all, however, is resisting the urge to panic and make dumb decisions based on a couple of unfortunate weeks.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.