Quote of the Day: Roy Halladay channels Shakespeare

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Roy Halladay was asked today about facing the Cardinals. And ask you can see from the reporter’s question, the reporter anticipated the whole thing in which athletes always say nice things about their opposition.  Halladay wasn’t having it:

Reporter: Can you talk about the balance of being in touch with what the other team’s capable of, having the proper respect, but at the end of all that, thinking about what do I know I can do and what our team is capable of, so you don’t give too much respect or too little? That balance there.

Halladay: I heard a quote a long time ago, I came here to bury Caesar, not praise him.

Sadly, Halladay didn’t simply drop the mic at that point and walk the hell off someplace. But let’s still give him credit for a little Shakespearean panache here.

UPDATE: To be clear, Halladay is not so straight gangsta that he just said that and ended it.  He went on to explain what he meant (i.e. that he respects the opposition yet has no doubt in his own team).  I clipped that because it was boring. Didn’t mean to mislead.  Still think it would be cooler if Halladay had dropped the mic there.

(via Crossing Broad)

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

Tim Warner/Getty Images
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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.