Offense was at its lowest level since 1992

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With the final totals in we can officially see what was pretty darn obvious throughout the season. Offense was down. Way down. Down to a level we had not seen since there were 26 teams in the league, I had a full head of hair and people actually thought that Mike Myers was hilarious. 1992, people. A different time. A different place.  The specifics, via Stats, LLC:

  • Teams averaged 4.28 runs per game. Lowest since 1992’s 4.12. The peak of the recent big-run era was 5.14 in 2000;
  • The home run average was down to 0.94 each team per game, also the lowest in 19 years and a sharp drop from 1.17 in 2000;
  • The major league batting average of .255 was the lowest since 1989;
  • The 3.94 ERA was also the lowest since 1992.

This stuff always brings out the “see, they’re not on steroids anymore” mob.  As I often say, I don’t find this to be a very satisfying explanation. No single-factor explanation of a complicated process every sits well with me, and baseball teams scoring runs is a complicated process.  Steroids testing likely had some effect in offensive decline over the past several years, but there are other things at work.

The way pitching is scouted and developed is one. It’s like anything else: there was a pitching shortage for many years, pitching became more valuable to teams and thus better pitchers and pitching approaches were discovered and developed. Defense has been emphasized. A lot of hitters have been slow to adjust to an era in which strikeouts are more harmful to offensive production than they were back when homers were easier to come by. I’m still not entirely convinced that there hasn’t been a change in the ball, but we’ll probably never know that.

Anyway, point is that offense is down. I think it’s all a part of the pendulum swinging back and forth like it always has in baseball. Your mileage may vary. But just be wary of silver bullet explanations about anything. They’re very rarely correct.

Gary Sanchez likely headed to disabled list

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Yankees catcher Gary Sanchez exited Sunday afternoon’s game against the Rays in the 10th inning due to a hip/groin issue. Manager Aaron Boone said Sanchez is likely headed to the 10-day disabled list, MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch reports.

Sanchez went 0-for-4 with a walk before departing. He appeared to suffer the injury running to first base when he grounded into a 6-4-3 double play in the 10th inning. On the season, Sanchez is batting .190/.291/.433 with 14 home runs, 41 RBI, and 36 runs scored in 265 plate appearances.

Austin Romine replaced Sanchez in the 10th inning and will handle the bulk of the catching responsibilities while Sanchez is out.