Mark DeRosa wants the Giants to move in the fences at AT&T Park

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We’ve heard a lot of stuff from the Mets about maybe moving the fences in to make the park more “fair.”  But at least one member of the San Francisco Giants feels that something should be done to AT&T Park. It’s Mark DeRosa, and here was his reaction when asked if the Giants’ home park should have some alternations:

“Without a doubt. Maybe you don’t move the fences in. But I think you saw maybe two balls go out to right-center this year. So they definitely should cut the corner. Have another wall go across. Maybe put something nice back there. I don’t know. Does San Francisco have a city tree?”

Giants brass says it’s been mentioned before, but that no one is seriously considering it. Bruce Bochy and Hensely Meulens don’t want to hear about it. Nothing is going to happen with that and DeRosa kind of comes off as a whiner.

There was a time when parks were what they were. Some were pitchers parks. Some were hitters parks. Yes, people messed around with dimensions — remember the time the Indians moved the fences way back to turn Alex Cole into the next Willie McGee? — but rarely was the gambit successful. The Yankees won the World Series eleventy billion times with an impossibly big left-center field and eleventy billion times with a more conventional fence. It’s about the players, not the park.

The Giants have a pitchers park. It’s worked out for them pretty good. They’re going to keep those dimensions much longer than they keep Mark DeRosa, that’s for sure.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.