A’s acquire Kila Ka’aihue from Royals for Ethan Hollingsworth

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Last week the Royals designated Kila Ka’aihue for assignment, removing him from the 40-man roster, and today they traded the 27-year-old first baseman to the A’s for minor-league pitcher Ethan Hollingsworth.

Ka’aihue’s track record in the minors is good enough and lengthy enough that he deserved a longer opportunity in the majors, but he flopped in a few brief stints with the Royals and career minor leaguers without any defensive skills tend to get fewer chances than their raw numbers warrant.

Oakland hasn’t pursued as many no-glove, good-hit minor leaguers in recent years, but back in the “Moneyball” days Ka’aihue was exactly the type of player Billy Beane and the A’s often took chances on. He’s hit .281 with a .412 on-base percentage and .497 slugging percentage in 353 career games at Triple-A.

Hollingsworth split this season between Double-A and Triple-A, throwing 105 innings with a 3.76 ERA and 73/27 K/BB ratio as a 24-year-old starter. He was the Rockies’ fourth-round draft pick in 2008 and came to the A’s in a deal for Clayton Mortensen last winter.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.