Tweet of the Day: Brad Pitt, sabermetrics’ biggest beneficiary

3 Comments

“Moneyball” opened in theaters nationwide on Friday and brought in $6.8 million within 24 hours.

It’s on pace to gross more than $20 million by the end of the day Sunday, the highest total ever for the opening weekend of a baseball-related drama.

Not that any of this was unexpected. Take a best-selling book, make it into a movie, cast Brad Pitt in the leading role, and you’re probably going to be in good shape. Add to that a 94% rating from Rotten Tomatoes and a well-crafted review from HBT’s own Aaron Gleeman, and you’re soaring.

Which all leads us to this gem from the official Twitter feed of Baseball-Reference.com:source:

The tweet might not be completely accurate, given that a Sony studio executive probably stands to gain the most financial profit from the flick, but the point is a funny one. For all the momentum that the sabermetrics movement has gained since the release of Michael Lewis’ book and for all the invaluable websites that it has helped spawned, a pretty-boy Hollywood actor with next to no knowledge about the game of baseball or its advanced metrics has benefited from the stuff more than almost anyone. Poor Bill James.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

Elsa/Getty Images
1 Comment

Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?