Giants haven’t ruled out eventual position change for Buster Posey

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Andrew Baggarly of the San Jose Mercury News reports that Buster Posey will indeed be the Giants’ everyday catcher next season. But beyond that? It’s hard to say.

Giants manager Bruce Bochy acknowledged yesterday that there was some internal debate about whether Posey would be better off at a position like first base, where he could prolong his career and avoid the daily rigors of playing the most demanding position in the game. While the 24-year-old could still be moved, they aren’t ready to go there yet.

“Well, yeah. We had internal discussions,” Bochy said. “But we’re all in agreement. We need Buster behind the plate.”

“That doesn’t mean, as you look down the road, whether it’s Hector Sanchez or someone else, (a position change) is a possibility,” Bochy said. “But playing next year isn’t going to shorten his career.”

Posey continues to progress well from reconstructive surgery on his left ankle. He is currently using a pitching machine to catch from the crouch and hopes to begin catching live pitching at the in November at the Giants’ minor league complex. While he still has some hurdles to cross, the Giants are optimistic that he’ll be ready for spring training.

Nathan Eovaldi to make 2018 debut for Rays soon

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Rays manager Kevin Cash said that pitcher Nathan Eovaldi will join the starting rotation on Monday or Tuesday to face the Athletics, Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports. Eovaldi’s rehab outing with Triple-A Durham went well, even though he gave up eight runs in four innings.

Eovaldi, 28, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2016 after undergoing Tommy John surgery. He had arthroscopic surgery in March to remove loose bodies in his elbow. It’s been a long road back. Knowing Eovaldi needed to recover from surgery, the Rays signed him to a one-year, $2 million contract in 2017 that included a $2 million club option for 2018 that they exercised last November.

When Eovaldi last pitched, he ranked among baseball’s hardest throwers, particularly among starters. He averaged 97.1 MPH on his fastball in 2016. Among starters who racked up at least 100 innings that season, only the Mets’ Noah Syndergaard had a higher average velocity (97.9 MPH). It remains to be seen if he still has that velocity after undergoing two procedures on his elbow.

The Rays will be glad to have Eovaldi back. The club has sustained injuries to Jake Faria, Yonny Chirinos, and Jose De Leon.