Tim Lincecum does not want a long term deal

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It seems like he’s been playing forever, but Tim Lincecum still has two more go-arounds in arbitration. Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle reports, however, that unlike most pitchers, Lincecum doesn’t want a long term deal:

“It’s just easier for me mentally not to have to put that kind of pressure on yourself,” he said. “Not that you don’t want to succeed, but when you’re signed to a long-term deal, it’s like saying, ‘I’m going to live up to every expectation.’ That’s why I like going year to year, so I can improve on it and not sit on what I’ve done.”

Based on a couple of in-depth profiles of the guy I’ve read I could totally see Lincecum thinking this way. And of course, seeing Barry Zito decompose in front of him these past couple of years probably hasn’t been the most uplifting experience.

That said, while there’s a lot of risk involved in not taking a long term deal, if Lincecum remains healthy and effective — big assumptions, but go with me here — I could totally see a series of one or two-year deals making him more money over the next few seasons that a big deal would.  Could you imagine one of the greatest pitchers in baseball essentially being open for bidding every year or every other year?

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.