The AL wild card tiebreaker could be bananas

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Whenever there is an outrageously wild game going on — usually college basketball, but sometimes baseball too — my friend Amanda Rykoff of espnW tweets that it’s “bananas.”  I wouldn’t dare speak for her, but I think she would agree that the AL wild card tiebreaker has some serious bananas potential.

If two teams are tied when the regular season is over, a one-game playoff will be held next Thursday. If the Rays are involved, the game will be played at Tropicana Field. If it’s between the Red Sox and Angels, the game is in Boston.  Simple enough so far.  OK, now it gets tricky.

A three-way tie will mean two playoff games, one on Thursday and one on Friday. Because of the various tiebreakers involved, the Rays would be the top seed, the Red Sox the second seed and the Angels the third. Here I’m just gonna quote Roger Mooney of the Tampa Tribune, because I think he laid it out better than anyone:

As the top seed, the Rays would have their choice between three plans, with the Red Sox picking second and the Angels getting what’s left.

Plan A: Get to play both games at home, providing you win Game 1.

Plan B: Play the first game on the road, win that and get the second game at home.

Plan C: Play the winner of Game 1, but do so on the road.

Got it?  Good. And no, no one knows what Joe Maddon would pick right now, because he wouldn’t say.  But let’s remember that the Rays didn’t exactly benefit from home field advantage in last year’s playoffs. They have a slight home field advantage in 2011. If I were them I take option C and play one game for the wild card rather than two, home field options be damned.

So, yeah, bananas.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?