No one does self loathing like Boston does self loathing

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Every city has a unique vibe when it comes to bad baseball news.  A lot of cities do the panic thing with some local  flavor or another. Many others simply tune out and look to another sport like football or hockey to take their minds off things. If the Yankees are doing poorly there’s usually some reference to an off-the-field distraction or clubhouse dispute as a means of explaining it all.  Chicago tends to go historical and take its bad news as if it had been ordained by Fate.

But Boston? Oh man, Boston does bitter better than ANYONE:

The math says the Sox are probably going to qualify for the tournament, but they should be barred on sheer principle and merit. Let the worthy teams participate in the playoffs. The Sox are not worthy. Really, how do you root for these guys anymore?

Sure, this is Dan Shaughnessy, but he’s been stirring the pot in Boston for a long time so he knows this will resonate with a lot of people.  Only question is whether, in the event the Sox make the playoffs and win it all, he turns on a dime and writes some book about it being all magical and crap.  I sort of hope he does, actually, because that kind of chutzpah can be a thing of beauty. I’d probably buy three copies.

Oh well. My only regret is that we have less than a week for the fan bases in Boston, Atlanta, St. Louis and Tampa Bay to tear themselves apart in their own unique way.  It’s great fun.

Kenley Jansen expected to be OK for spring training after heart procedure

Kenley Jansen
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Building on a report from early September, Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen is slated to undergo a heart procedure on November 26. The estimated recovery time ranges from two to eight weeks, according to comments Jansen made Friday, and he expects to be able to rejoin the team once spring training rolls around next year.

Jansen, 31, was first diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat in 2011 and missed significant time during the 2011, 2012, and 2018 seasons due to the condition. He underwent his first surgery to correct the irregularity in 2012, but suffered recurring symptoms that could not be treated long-term with the heart medication and blood thinners that had been prescribed to him. Scarier still was the “atrial fibrillation episode” that the reliever experienced during a road trip to Colorado in August; per MLB.com’s Ken Gurnick, the high altitude exacerbated his heart condition and left him susceptible to future episodes in the event that he chose to return to the Rockies’ Coors Field.

Heart issues notwithstanding, the veteran right-hander pitched through his third straight All-Star season in 2018. Overall, he saw a downward trend in most of his stats, but still collected 38 saves in 59 opportunities and finished the season with a respectable 3.01 ERA, 2.1 BB/9 and 10.3 SO/9 through 71 2/3 innings. In October, he helped carry the Dodgers to their second consecutive pennant and wrapped up his sixth postseason run with three saves, two blown saves, and a 1.69 ERA across 10 2/3 innings.