Thwarted Mets investor now a Yankees limited partner

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Someone once said that there is nothing more limited than being a limited partner to George Steinbrenner. I’m assuming that’s still the case with Hal Steinbrenner too. But with better cash flow and less likelihood of a capital call, I’m assuming that being a Yankees minority shareholder is a better deal than being a minority shareholder in the Mets. It certainly is to Ray Bartoszek.

Bartoszek is an oil trader who, a few months ago, wanted to buy a minority share in the Mets.  The Mets decided instead to negotiate with David Einhorn, so Bartoszek took his money and gave it to the Yankees instead:

By the time negotiations with Einhorn fell apart this month, however, the Mets could not turn back to Bartoszek. Besides feeling that the Mets’ owners had manipulated him to apply more leverage against Einhorn, Bartoszek had found a better deal. He would instead invest with the Yankees.

Last Friday, Bartoszek emerged as the newest limited partner with the Yankees, buying a share of the team from another limited partner.

Bartoszek said that his dealings with the Yankees were “the most straightforward negotiation [he’s] ever been a part of.”  Which suggests, as does the article, that he felt the Mets were using him in order to leverage other bidders like Einhorn. Who knows if that’s true, but it’s kind of funny how he was able to buy into a team for which no one knew was accepting investors way easier than one which basically had its hat in its hand.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.