Joe Maddon on the weight of a late-season collapse

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Joe Maddon was on the Dan Patrick show yesterday and he said something that just reinforces my belief that he’s one of the brighter bulbs in the game. Not in a “Maddon is a baseball genius” way, but just in terms of a guy who is able to move beyond the tired cliches and actually explain stuff to you once in a while.

This was about the Red Sox’ late-season collapse. Granted, since he’s not currently in a late season collapse he can speak more freely about it, but it’s nice to hear someone talk about it by saying something other than “well, you can’t press … can’t panic.”  Of course it affects people. And this affect Maddon describes resonates:

I was involved in 1995 with the Angles when we lost a 13-game lead. It was really awkward walking into the ballpark. You felt really heavy. There was this weight about it walking into the ballpark where actually your legs didn’t want to seem to work either. It’s an odd life experience and it comes through sports primarily I think when things are slipping like that. It can be difficult and you need a couple of guys more than anything to lift that burden somehow, but it’s hard to really get that burden off you when you starting doing that heavy.”

There have been a couple of times in my life when I was in some serious deep funks. And I remember that weight — in a very literal, not metaphorical sense — pressing on my body. It was hard to walk down the sidewalk. It was hard to get out of chairs.  It’s half crazy, but I wonder if there’s some way to gauge a baserunner or an outfielder’s speed in a big slump vs. his speed when things are going well. I’ve felt that weight and believe it exists.

Dodgers to retire Fernando Valenzuela’s No. 34 this summer

Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sports
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LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles Dodgers will retire the No. 34 jersey of pitcher Fernando Valenzuela during a three-day celebration this summer.

Valenzuela was part of two World Series champion teams, winning the 1981 Rookie of the Year and Cy Young awards. He was a six-time All-Star during his 11 seasons in Los Angeles from 1980-90.

He will be honored from Aug. 11-13 when the Dodgers host Colorado.

Valenzuela will join Pee Wee Reese, Tommy Lasorda, Duke Snider, Gil Hodges, Jim Gilliam, Don Sutton, Walter Alston, Sandy Koufax, Roy Campanella, Jackie Robinson and Don Drysdale with retired numbers.

“To be a part of the group that includes so many legends is a great honor,” Valenzuela said. “But also for the fans, the support they’ve given me as a player and working for the Dodgers, this is also for them.”