It’s bombs away off Bronson Arroyo

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The Brewers have already hit three homers in three innings off Bronson Arroyo, with Prince Fielder going deep in the second and Mark Kotsay and Ryan Braun delivering back-to-back shots in the third.  That makes 43 homers allowed by Arroyo this season.

Arroyo is now tied for sixth on the all-time single-season homers allowed list:

1. Bert Blyleven: 50 (271 2/3 IP, 1986 Twins)
2. Jose Lima: 48 (196 1/3 IP, 2000 Astros)
3. Bert Blyleven: 46 (267 IP, 1987 Twins)
3. Robin Roberts: 46 (297 1/3 IP, 1956 Phillies)
5. Jamie Moyer: 44 (202 IP, 2004 Mariners)
6. Bronson Arroyo: 43 (178 2/3 IP, 2011 Reds)
6. Eric Milton: 43 (201 IP, 2004 Phillies)
6. Pedro Ramos: 43 (231 IP, 1957 Senators)
9. Denny McLain: 42 (264 1/3 IP, 1966 Tigers)
10. Rick Helling: 41 (219 1/3 IP, 1999 Rangers)
10. Phil Niekro: 41 (342 IP, 1979 Braves)
10. Robin Roberts: 41 (305 IP, 1955 Phillies)

Blyleven (in both cases), Niekro, Helling and Roberts (in the latter case) all had good seasons while giving up all those homers.  Arroyo’s season, though, is right there with Lima’s for the worst on the list.  Lima was 7-16 with a 6.65 ERA in a high-offense era.  Arroyo has a 5.39 ERA at the moment.

On a per-inning bases, Lima’s 2000 season above is the only one that ranks above Arroyo as far as home run rate.  Arroyo is giving up .241 homers per inning.  Lima allowed .244.

Update: Arroyo stayed in until the seventh and gave up one more homer, that to George Kottaras.  It gave him 44 for the season, leaving him tied for fifth place all-time.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.