Comment of the Day: How many people really watch MLB games?

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In an earlier post I wondered about how many people actually watch MLB games overall, not just on the national broadcasts.  Reader tjwilliams did some calculations:

Okay, so I just did some quick back-of-the-napkin math and came up with 1.65 billion viewers for NFL (live and TV) and 1.01 billion viewers for MLB (live and TV).  Here’s how I got there.

The NFL numbers were fairly simple.  An average of 17.9 million people watched each NFL game last year (not including playoffs) and there are roughly 91 games broadcast each year (18 MNF, 17 CBS, 17 Fox, 9 Doubleheader, 17 NBC, 8 NFL Network, plus a smattering of Saturday and Thanksgiving games).  That totals about 1.63 billion viewers.  Add in the roughly 17.2 million people who annually attend in person and you get a total of roughly 1.65 billion people.

MLB is a little tougher.  The regional broadcasts in 2010 varied between 210,000 average viewers (Phillies) and 14,000 average viewers (Nationals).  I estimated a mean of 100,000 viewers for each team which, when figured for 30 teams and 150 games equals 450 million viewers.  2011 attendance figures project that annual MLB attendance will be 74.2 million.  Finally, the national broadcasts seem to attract anywhere between 2 and 5 million viewers depending on day, time, and teams.  I figured an average of 3.5 million viewers per game with approximately 140 nationally televised games each year totaled 490 million.  All totaled, roughly 1.01 billion people viewed MLB games.

Obviously, the NFL gets more eyeballs.  But it’s not leaps and bounds above MLB.

Reader sportsdrenched then added the following:

That kind of jives with the estimations that the NFL had 9.2 Billion in revenue in 2010, and MLB had 7.2 Billion.  We can all agree that NFL is King in America.  But clearly MLB is holding it’s own and is no where near the death bed a lot of people think it is.

As with any back-of-the-napkin calculations, there are probably some things being left out here, but I think this is, at the very least, a good start.  Yes, the NFL is more popular and more widely-watched.  But it’s not by orders of magnitude.


Royals acquire Brian Goodwin from Nationals

Brian Goodwin
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The Royals have acquired outfielder Brian Goodwin from the Nationals, the teams announced Sunday. The Nationals received minor league right-handed reliever Jacob Condra-Bogan in the deal.

Goodwin, 27, was working through his third campaign with the Nationals in 2018. He saw limited playing time in the outfield (mostly due to the trifecta of talent the club already had in Bryce Harper, Adam Eaton, and Juan Soto), and finished the first half of the season with a .200/.321/.354 batting line, three home runs, three stolen bases and a .674 OPS in just 79 plate appearances. The Royals, who appear thin on compelling center field options at the moment, are expected to utilize him on a more frequent basis once he’s added to the active roster.

The 23-year-old Condra-Bogan has yet to break into the majors with any team so far. He got his start in pro ball in 2017 with the independent Washington WildThings of the Frontier League and issued three runs, three walks and 15 strikeouts over 15 1/3 innings before signing on with the Royals as a free agent. This season, he pitched to an impressive 2.08 ERA, 0.7 BB/9 and 13.5 SO/9 through 26 innings in Single-A Lexington before getting transferred to High-A Wilmington for a single appearance. The Nationals have not announced where he’ll be assigned for the remainder of 2018.