Carlos Quentin returns from DL, but how much will he play?

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Carlos Quentin is back from the disabled list after missing the past three weeks with a shoulder injury, but he returns to a much more crowded White Sox lineup.

Quentin’s injury opened the door for 22-year-old rookie Dayan Viciedo, who’s hit .354 in 14 games since being called up. With the White Sox all but out of the playoff picture they seem unlikely to bench Viciedo and Alejandro De Aza isn’t sitting after batting .324 with a .930 OPS in 39 games.

That leaves Quentin to fight for playing time with Alex Rios, Adam Dunn, and Juan Pierre, with basically two open spots in the lineup for those four veterans. Two are left-handed hitters (Pierre, Dunn) and two are right-handed hitters (Rios, Quentin), so in theory manager Ozzie Guillen could form a pair of quasi-platoons. Or he could just bench Dunn and rotate the other three through two spots.

For today at least Quentin and Dunn are on the bench and Rios is at designated hitter.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.