Miguel Tejada after being released by Giants: “I will not retire”

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San Francisco officially parted ways with Miguel Tejada yesterday, releasing the veteran infielder with a month remaining on his one-year, $6.5 million contract.

Tejada more than earned the release by playing horrible defense and hitting .239 with a .596 OPS, and then for good measure he publicly complained about being asked to lay down a sacrifice bunt.

However, today Tejada told Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes that he plans to play in 2012, saying: “I will not retire.”

Here’s more from the 37-year-old former MVP:

I didn’t have a good time in San Francisco, but there are always highs and lows in life. I will play winter ball with the Aguilas Cibaenas as part of the process of staying active. In the winter I will work to return. It’s not the first time that a player has a bad year and then comes back.

True, but not many players have a .596 OPS at age 37 and go on to be anything but terrible. In fact, not many 37-year-old infielders post a sub-.600 OPS, period. The last one do so with at least 300 plate appearances was Frank White way back in 1988. He went on to play two more seasons as a part-timer for the Royals, hitting .241 with a .608 OPS.

Brian Sabean gave him $6.5 million six months ago, so I suppose anything is possible, but it’ll be surprising if Tejada manages more than a one-year, $1 million deal as a free agent this time around and he may have to settle for a minor-league contract.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.