Pirates rule out Paul Maholm, Kevin Correia for rest of season

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The Pirates shifted rotation mainstays Paul Maholm and Kevin Correia to the 60-day disabled list on Tuesday, officially bringing their seasons to an end.

Maholm went on the DL on Aug. 20 with a left shoulder strain after going 6-14 with a 3.66 ERA in 26 starts, leaving the Pirates with a tough decision to make this winter.  His option for 2012 is worth $9.75 million, which seems excessive for a guy who is 53-73 lifetime.  Maholm, though, had a career-best ERA this year, and he had made at least 29 starts in each of his previous five full seasons.  He’d likely land a multiyear deal as a free agent if the Pirates let him go.

Correia, a surprise All-Star, ended his year 12-11 with a 4.79 ERA.  He’s been sidelined since Aug. 19 with a strained oblique muscle.  Correia was 7-4 with a 3.44 ERA after two months, but he faded fast from there and went 1-5 over his last eight starts.

The Pirates made the moves today to help create room for callups.  Brought back to the majors were third baseman Pedro Alvarez, left-hander Aaron Thompson and left-hander Daniel Moskos.  Left-hander Jeff Locke and right-hander Jared Hughes will make their major league debuts.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

Marlins
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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: