Josh Johnson blames “tall man’s syndrome” for arm injuries

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After months of false starts and setbacks Josh Johnson was finally shut down for the season a few days ago, meaning he ended up missing the final 120 games of the year with a shoulder injury that is still described as merely “inflammation.”

Johnson has a long history of arm problems, limiting one of the most dominant starters in baseball to an average of just 119 innings per season since his brilliant debut in 2006.

And yesterday the 27-year-old Marlins ace told Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald that “tall man’s syndrome” may be to blame for all the injuries:

It’s a matter of posture and a bunch of stuff that just kind of led up to it. Years and years of being tall, you’re always slouching down and bending over. You’re shoulder’s not in a good place. You start leaning over when you’re throwing. It snowballs.

Johnson apparently got that theory from a therapist and Spencer reports that the 6-foot-7 right-hander is “now paying close attention to his posture, standing straighter to relieve pressure on his scapula and wearing a customized shirt that helps keep his shoulders back.”

My initial reaction is to note that plenty of short pitchers have similarly lengthy injury histories and plenty of tall pitchers are injury free, but at this point Johnson and the Marlins are probably pretty open to ideas about how to keep him off the disabled list.

Red Sox considering using Mookie Betts at second base when World Series is in L.A.

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Jason Mastrodonato of the Boston Herald reports that the Red Sox are considering using Mookie Betts at second base when the Dodgers host Game 3, 4, and 5 of the World Series in Los Angeles. That would allow J.D. Martinez to remain in the lineup as an outfielder, since the DH rule would not be in effect.

Betts, 26, has played a bit of second base in the big leagues. He played 122 innings there in his rookie season in 2014 and played another six innings there on August 3 this year against the Yankees. Betts also entered Boston’s minor league system as a middle infielder, so it’s not like the Red Sox are asking someone completely unqualified to handle the position. Given what else we know about Mookie Betts, such as the fact he can solve a Rubik’s cube in less than two minutes and he has bowled a 300 in the Professional Bowlers Association, he is basically good at anything he decides to do.

That being said, Betts was noticeably not very productive at the plate during the ALCS against the Astros. He hit just .217 with no home runs in 25 plate appearances. The Red Sox are certainly hoping he heats up against the Dodgers.