The greatness of Ivan Nova is yet to be fully appreciated

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It’s fair to say Ivan Nova is on pretty nice roll right now. He is 11-0 dating back to early June and 7-0 with a 3.45 ERA over seven starts since returning from the minor leagues at the end of July. This includes seven innings of two-run ball in a win over the Blue Jays last night.

Nova is building a pretty strong case to be the Yankees’ No. 2 starter in the playoffs and with 15 wins, he should get plenty of votes for the American League Rookie of the Year award. Most sane baseball fans should be content to leave it at that, but Rob Parker of ESPN New York is here to tell you that the greatness of Nova is yet to be fully appreciated.

New York hasn’t seen a rookie stud pitcher like this since Doc Gooden went 17-9 for the Mets in 1984. Of course, Nova doesn’t have the strikeout magic that Gooden had. But he gets outs and wins.

Yes, that just happened. Parker is comparing Ivan Nova and his 3.99 FIP to Dwight Gooden, who had one of the best rookie seasons of all-time when he posted a 1.69 FIP for the Mets in 1984. Making this an argument about wins is about as intellectually lazy as you can get.

I don’t want to take anything away from Nova, because he has pitched quite well recently, but his numbers are actually very close to Jon Niese, who posted a 4.20 ERA (4.10 FIP, 3.89 xFIP) as a rookie with the crosstown Mets last season. A nice year, yes, but Nova’s contributions wouldn’t look nearly impressive if he was pitching somewhere else.

Video: Gleyber Torres slugs a home run in his fourth straight game

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Yankees rookie second baseman Gleyber Torres has a fun streak going right now: He’s homered in four straight games, becoming the youngest American League player to do so.

The historic knock arrived in the seventh inning of Friday’s series opener against the Angels. With two outs and the bases empty, Torres pounced on a 1-3 fastball from Jim Johnson and posted it to the right field bleachers for a go-ahead run:

It was just the Yankees’ second run of the night (the first having also been provided by Torres on an RBI single in the second inning), but the only one they needed to maintain an edge over the Angels.

Torres, 21, is off to a torrid start this season. Following Saturday’s 2-1 win, he now carries a .333/.393/.646 batting line, nine home runs and a 1.038 OPS through 106 plate appearances. In the past four games alone, he’s gone 7-for-15 with five homers (including a pair of solo shots, a two-run homer and three-run homer) and nine RBI. He’ll have to collect a home run in his next five games if he wants to set a new all-time record, however: Dale Long (1956 Pirates), Don Mattingly (1987 Yankees), and Ken Griffey Jr. (1993 Mariners) currently share the record for the longest home run-hitting streak, at eight games apiece.