Scheduling disruptions are a bit overstated

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In a vacuum I understand the Yankees’ frustration with having to burn one of their two remaining offdays — September 8th — to make up one of the washed-out Orioles games.  Off-days are precious this time of the season.

I’m also sympathetic to Joe Girardi’s argument that there should have been a doubleheader scheduled for Friday. It seemed like a no-brainer at the time given the weather forecast and I still can’t think of a rational reason why the Orioles wouldn’t go for it.

Finally, I’m less-than-impressed with those who have cited Mike Flanagan’s death as a reason why the Orioles couldn’t be expected to be more reasonable and flexible about all of this. They’re totally different issues and, sadly, teams have had to deal with the death of one of their own before, including active players and coaches.

But like I said, that’s in a vacuum. It’s significant with respect to fairness from-team-to-team and all of that. But not in an absolute sense. And there is a limit to how much patience I have for anyone complaining too much about the schedule disruptions. And the reason for that is explained fairly well in this Boston Globe article on the subject today:

One could make the case that schedule and travel issues are overrated, and they often are. Baseball travel is better even than first class for the average Joe, where everything is taken care of for you. Hotel accommodations are first class. Players do not want for any convenience, and of course, they can always sleep on the plane.

You’re familiar with the “first world problems” meme?  This is, like, supra-first-world-problems.  Put your big boy pants on and deal with it.

(thanks to MooseinOhio for the heads up)