Rangers expected to call up prospect outfielder Leonys Martin

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The Rangers may step up their pursuit of Lance Berkman now that Nelson Cruz will be sidelined for three weeks following yet another hamstring injury, but an intriguing in-house replacement is on his way from the minor leagues.

According to Jeff Wilson of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, prospect outfielder Leonys Martin will take Cruz’s place on the active roster tomorrow.

Martin, who defected from Cuba last year, was added to the 40-man roster after signing a five-year, $15.5 million contract with the Rangers in May. The 23-year-old batted .348/.435/.571 with four homers, 24 RBI and a 15/8 K/BB ratio over 135 plate appearances with Double-A Frisco, but has struggled a bit since being promoted to Triple-A Round Rock last month, hitting .263/.316/.314 with a .630 OPS over 192 plate appearances. Still, he has plus-speed and is highly regarded for his defense in center field.

It wasn’t too long ago that the Rangers were considering using Martin as their primary center fielder down the stretch, but given his struggles in Triple-A and the strong play of Endy Chavez, that’s unlikely to happen now. Wilson believes that David Murphy will serve as the primary right fielder during Cruz’s absence, so Martin will likely function as a backup outfielder and pinch-runner down the stretch.

Kirk Gibson home run happened 30 years ago

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With the Dodgers trying to make it back to the World Series for the second year in a row — and trying to win it for the first time in 30 years — it’s worth looking back at the last time they won it. More specifically, it’s worth looking back at the signature moment from the last time they won it. Which, really, was one of baseball’s all-time signature moments.

Yep, I’m talking about Kirk Gibson’s famous game-winning home run off of Dennis Eckersley of the Oakland Athletics in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, which happened 30 years ago tonight.

All playoff magic for anyone too young to remember Bill Mazeroski’s homer in 1960 is measured against Gibson taking Dennis Eckersley downtown to turn a 4-3 deficit into a 5-4 win. Heck, even if you were around in 1960, it’s far less likely that you saw Mazeroski’s homer than it was for you to have seen Gibson’s. Nationally broadcast in prime time to a nation of millions who had not yet fragmented into viewers of hundreds of obscure cable channels and various forms of streaming entertainments, it was a moment that sent shockwaves through the world of sports.

For my part, I was fifteen years-old, sitting in my living room in Beckley, West Virginia watching it as it happened. Like most of the rest of the country, I was convinced that the Dodgers had no chance to beat the mighty Bash Brothers and the 104-win Oakland A’s. Especially given that the Dodgers’ leader, MVP-to-be Gibson, was hobbled and not starting. Even when he was called on to pinch hit, I had no faith that he’d be able to touch Eckersley, the best relief pitcher on the planet, let alone hit the ball with any kind of authority.

But, as Vin said when he called it, the Dodgers’ year was so improbable that, in hindsight, it made perfect sense for Gibson to have done the impossible: