Diamondbacks ace Ian Kennedy leads the NL in wins

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I’m not much for pitcher wins, as they involve so many factors beyond how well someone pitched, but with Justin Verlander getting all kinds of attention for reaching 20 victories it’s at least worth noting that the NL wins leader is now Ian Kennedy.

Kennedy picked up his 17th victory with seven innings of one-run ball against the Padres yesterday, lowering his ERA to 3.03 and improving his K/BB ratio to 161/49 in 187 innings.

Kennedy, who was acquired from the Yankees in the massive three-team deal that also saw Curtis Granderson go to New York in December of 2009, has won eight of his last nine starts while the Diamondbacks take control of the NL West.

And while his win total is on the fortunate side his overall performance is no fluke, as Kennedy is a former first-round pick and top-ranked prospect whose career was derailed by injuries. He was plenty good last season with a 3.80 ERA and 168/70 K/BB ratio in 194 innings for Arizona and now he’s emerged as a potential Game 1 playoff starter at age 26.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.