Derek Jeter ties passes Mickey Mantle for most games played as a Yankee

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UPDATE: I screwed up: Jeter passed Mantle in yesterday’s game. He tied Mantle on Friday.

Derek Jeter played in the front end of yesterday’s Yankees-Orioles doubleheader. In doing so he played his 2,402nd game as a Yankee. That put him past Mickey Mantle on the all-time Yankees games-played list.

Only 22 men* have appeared in as many as 2,400 games for a single team. All but five of those guys — Dave Concepcion, Pete Rose Dwight Evans, Craig Biggio and Jeter — are in the Hall of Fame. Rose would have been but for his personal foibles. Biggio probably will be. And so too, obviously, will Derek Jeter one day.

*Cal Ripken, Brooks Robinson, Dwight Evans, Carl Yastrzemski, Dave Concepcion, Pete Rose, Ty Cobb, Al Kaline, Jeter, Mantle, Willie Mays, Mel Ott, Hank Aaron, Ernie Banks, Luke Appling, Biggio, George Brett, Robin Yount, Mike Schmidt, Roberto Clemente, Tony Gwynn, Stan Musial.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.