Pudge Rodriguez wants to stay in Washington

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Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post has a story today about how Ivan Rodriguez wants to continue to play — and continue to play in Washington — after his two-year contract is up after this season.

Given that he’s now completely ineffective with a bat and can’t stay healthy, one may ask what the value proposition is for the Nationals in keeping Rodriguez around.  You’ll be shocked to learn that his agent, Scott Boras, has an idea about that:

“I think Pudge brings so much to a team. He and [Stephen Strasburg] have a very good relationship. Pudge has answers, because he’s been in the league so long. And his answers are very, very refined and simple to a lot of players. He can go up to a lot of players and say, ‘Look, I’ve been there, I’ve done that. Do this, do that. If you do this, this is what happens.’ And the players believe it, because he’s been in the league that long. I think there’s tremendous value. I see pitchers – great young arms – come into the big leagues, and it’s so difficult to develop them if there’s not a veteran catcher, or if there’s not a veteran No. 1 starter on the team.”

Can anyone tell me how Pudge couldn’t provide all of that value to the Nationals as a coach?  And while we’re at it, in light of the Brian Schneider article yesterday, did someone declare it “sing the praises of backup catchers” week and not let me know?  Because I have a “David Ross is your Daddy” post I’ve been saving for just such an occasion.

Video: Rhys Hoskins gets revenge against Jacob Rhame with homer, slooooow trot

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Wednesday night’s Phillies-Mets game did not feature any beanballs or benches-clearing brawls, but it did feature Rhys Hoskins getting his revenge against Jacob Rhame. Last night, Rhame threw a fastball up-and-in at Hoskins. Rhame maintained his innocence, though Hoskins was skeptical.

Hoskins got a chance for revenge against Rhame in the ninth inning with the Phillies already ahead 4-0. Bryce Harper drew a leadoff walk. Hoskins then worked a 1-1 count before drilling a 95 MPH fastball over the left field fence for a two-run home run. Hoskins milked his accomplishment, taking a 34-second stroll around the bases. For a point of comparison, MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo notes that noted speedster Bartolo Colón had a 30.5-second trot around the bases after homering in 2016. MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki notes that Hoskins’ longest home run trot prior to this was clocked at 28.88 seconds. Wednesday’s trot was the first this season above 30 seconds across the league.

The dinger is Hoskins’ seventh of the season. He also walked and tripled in Wednesday’s 6-0 win. On the season, Hoskins is now batting .273/.402/.580 with 20 RBI and 18 runs scored in 107 plate appearances.