And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Athletics 6, Yankees 5: The Yankees were down 6-0 entering the bottom of the eighth whenNick Swisher hit a three-run homer. In the ninth Jorge Posada added another one, and then Robinson Cano walked with the bases loaded to male it 6-5. The bases still juiced with two out when Andrew Bailey induced a harmless fly ball to Swisher. Game over. Close but no cigar, Bombers. Until that Swisher homer, Brandon McCarthy was takin’ care of business.

Indians 7, Mariners 5, Mariners 12, Indians 7: Hit the front of this one up yesterday (short version: Choo!).  The nightcap: revenge of the M’s.  In between the games I did a radio spot on an Ohio station during which the hosts voiced optimism about the Indians’ chances given the dramatic game one win. Me: not feelin’ it.

Tigers 2, Rays 1: One of the reasons I’m not feelin’ it: Detroit is starting to get good pitching performances from guys not named Justin Verlander. Brad Penny here: 6 IP, 8 H, 1 ER.

Phillies 9, Mets 4: Vance Worley may have shut the Mets down while striking out nine over seven innings, but really, the win has to go to Brian Scheneider. Sure, he may have gone 0 for 4 with a couple of strikeouts, but I read all about it yesterday. He’s the key, dude.

Royals 6, Blue Jays 4: Brandon Morrow fooled no one, allowing six runs on eleven hits in four and two-thirds. My main man Frenchie went 4 for 5. Eric Hosmer was 3 for 5 with a homer.

Diamondbacks 2, Nationals 0: Ian Kennedy got his 16th win after throwing seven shutout innings helping the Dbacks snap a six-game skid. This one got a bit chippy with plunkings. Justin Upton, who has been hit A LOT by the Nationals, had to leave the game after getting hit by Jordan Zimmermann. Kennedy subsequently had one get away from him (I presume he’d say that anyway) while facing Michael Morse.

Padres 7, Giants 5: San Francisco fails to keep pace with Arizona. Fifth straight win for the Padres. Three errors for the Giants. And on one play Aubrey Huff and Cody Ross collided while going after a foul ball. This being the Giants, miraculously, no one was decapitated or impaled.

Brewers 11, Pirates 4: Nyjer Morgan gets the cover of Sports Illustrated and he goes 4 for 6 with a double and two RBI. It was a good day to be Tony Plush.

Dodgers 13, Cardinals 2: It’s not like Clayton Kershaw needed all of that support, but hey, whatever. Rod Barajas with two homers. Tony La Russa protested this game on account of the rule that says [“mmfhmmnfggss …..”].  Really, he just mumbled that under his breath, hoping he could at least get a hearing with Joe Torre out of it.

Reds 8, Marlins 6: Johnny Cueto walked six guys in five innings and put the Reds in a hole, but Cincy battled back, rallying against the Marlins pen. Yonder Alonso lies the castle of my faddah … oh, wait. I keep wanting to say that. What I meant to say was Yonder Alonso went 3 for 4 and drove in four.

Orioles 8, Twins 1: Three hits each for J.J. Hardy, Vlad Guerrero and Mark Reynolds. Alfredo Simon, who spent the winter and then spring training in a jail cell, tied the Twins up like nobody’s business (8 IP, 3 H, 1 ER, 8K).

Red Sox 11, Rangers 5: Two homers for Adrian Gonzalez. John Lackey now has 12 wins, which is more than Josh Beckett has and is only one behind Jon Lester. And wins make a pitcher better, right?

Angels 5, White Sox 4: Another dramatic win for the Halos, this one on a walkoff RBI single for Peter Bourjos, who smacked one through a drawn-in infield. It’s the Angels’ fifth straight win, the third coming on their last at bat.

Rockies 8, Astros 6: Seth Smith hit a 478-foot home run. Jonathan Herrera hit one that lined just over the fence. They each counted for two runs, because them’s the rules. Astros reliever Wesley Wright did that pitch-to-one-guy, move out to right field, pitch-to-another guy thing. Clevah.

UPDATE: If there was any doubt that I am NOT a Braves homer — at least not an irrational, unfair one — I forgot to put the Braves game in the recap when I first published it:

Braves 5, Cubs 4: Jason Heyward went 3 for 4 with a grand slam.  OK Fredi, ya still gonna bench him if Jose Constanza is available tonight?

Jones, Maddux, Morris consider Bonds, Clemens for Hall

USA TODAY Sports
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COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. — Hall of Famers Chipper Jones, Greg Maddux, Jack Morris and Ryne Sandberg are among 16 members of the contemporary baseball era committee that will meet to consider the Cooperstown fate of an eight-man ballot that includes Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Rafael Palmeiro.

Hall of Famers Lee Smith, Frank Thomas and Alan Trammell also are on the panel, which will meet in San Diego ahead of the winter meetings.

They will be joined by former Toronto CEO Paul Beeston, former Boston Red Sox and Chicago Cubs executive Theo Epstein, Anaheim Angels owner Arte Moreno, Miami Marlins general manager Kim Ng, Minnesota Twins president Dave St. Peter and Chicago White Sox executive vice president Ken Williams.

Three media members/historians are on the committee: longtime statistical analyst Steve Hirdt of Stats Perform, La Velle E. Neal III of the Minneapolis Star Tribune and Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle. Neal and Slusser are past presidents of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.

Hall Chairman Jane Forbes Clark will be the committee’s non-voting chair.

The ballot also includes Albert Belle, Don Mattingly, Fred McGriff, Dale Murphy and Curt Schilling. The committee considers candidates whose careers were primarily from 1980 on. A candidate needs 75% to be elected and anyone who does will be inducted on July 23, along with anyone chosen in the BBWAA vote, announced on Jan. 24.

Bonds, Clemens and Schilling fell short in January in their 10th and final appearances on the BBWAA ballot. Bonds received 260 of 394 votes (66%), Clemens 257 (65.2%) and Schilling 231 (58.6%).

Palmeiro was dropped from the BBWAA ballot after receiving 25 votes (4.4%) in his fourth appearance in 2014, falling below the 5% minimum needed to stay on. His high was 72 votes (12.6%) in 2012.

Bonds denied knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs and Clemens maintains he never used PEDs. Palmeiro was suspended for 10 days in August 2005 following a positive test under the major league drug program, just over two weeks after getting his 3,000th hit.

A seven-time NL MVP, Bonds set the career home run record with 762 and the season record with 73 in 2001. A seven-time Cy Young Award winner, Clemens went 354-184 with a 3.12 ERA and 4,672 strikeouts, third behind Nolan Ryan (5,714) and Randy Johnson (4,875). Palmeiro had 3,020 hits and 568 homers.

Schilling fell 16 votes shy with 285 (71.1%) in 2021. Support dropped after hateful remarks he made in retirement toward Muslims, transgender people, reporters and others.

McGriff got 169 votes (39.8%) in his final year on the BBWAA ballot in 2019. Murphy was on the BBWAA ballot 15 times and received a high of 116 votes (23.2%) in 2000. Mattingly received a high of 145 votes (28.2%) in the first of 15 appearances on the BBWAA ballot in 2001, and Belle appeared on two BBWAA ballots, receiving 40 votes (7.7%) in 2006 and 19 (3.5%) in 2007.

Players on Major League Baseball’s ineligible list cannot be considered, a rule that excludes Pete Rose.

This year’s BBWAA ballot includes Carlos Beltran, John Lackey and Jered Weaver among 14 newcomers and Scott Rolen, Todd Helton and Billy Wagner among holdovers.