Alex Rodriguez is still gambling for high stakes

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I’m not sure anyone anywhere really thinks Alex Rodriguez playing high-stakes poker is a big deal, but with MLB repeatedly telling him to stop gambling and his involvement in Hollywood home games making headlines recently you’d think he might at least give it a rest for a while.

Instead the New York Post reports that Rodriguez “was spotted last Monday in a high-stakes gaming room at the Mohegan Sun Casino in the Poconos” while rehabbing his surgically repaired knee with the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre team at Triple-A.

That’s perfectly legal, of course, and Rodriguez is surely far from the only MLB player to gamble for high stakes in a casino, but that tells you how little he cares about MLB’s warnings.

When asked about the Post‘s report Rodriguez denied that he played poker, calling it “laughable” and “completely false.” And that might be true, as the high-stakes room he reportedly spent a couple hours in is mostly used for blackjack and slot machines. Either way, Bud Selig and company probably aren’t too happy and Rodriguez clearly couldn’t care less.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.