Giants not planning payback in rematch vs. Marlins

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The San Francisco Giants take on the Florida Marlins in a three-game series beginning Friday.

At first glance, this might not seem like much of a series, what with the Marlins entering the weekend on a seven-game losing streak, and the Giants preparing to face the talented Atlanta Braves early next week. But then we are reminded that this is the first meeting between the two teams since late May, a fateful series that saw San Francisco lose star catcher Buster Posey on a controversial play at the plate.

When Scott Cousins barreled into Posey, it knocked the young star out for the season, effectively changed the Giants’ season and also caused Brian Sabean to lose his mind.

So much has changed with these two teams, though. Jack McKeon is running the show in Florida and Cousins has been out since June with a back injury. And the Giants have replaced Posey’s bat – if not his leadership – with Carlos Beltran (who is also now hurt).

So now, with the teams meeting for the first time since then, should we expect some fireworks? In a word, no.

“We’ve moved on,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy told Andrew Baggerly of the San Jose Mercury News. “We have bigger things to be worried about. That’s trying to win and get to the postseason. What happened is behind us.”

More from Baggerly:

Posey, after two surgeries to repair torn ankle ligaments, isn’t looking back, either. He declined multiple interview requests as the Florida series loomed. Posey is only now beginning to put weight on his left foot, but other wounds haven’t healed. He still hasn’t reached out to return Cousins’ apologetic phone call.

“Buster wants to move forward, and I’m proud of how these guys have not dwelled on what happened,” Bochy said. “When you lose your starting catcher and cleanup hitter, it’s devastating.”

In truth, the Giants have a lot more to worry about than the Florida Marlins. With a dramatic victory over the Houston Astros on Thursday night, the D-backs have taken a full game lead in the NL West, and they don’t appear to be going anywhere.

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Major League Baseball told Kolten Wong to ditch Hawaii tribute sleeve

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Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Major League Baseball has told Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong that he has to get rid of the colorful arm sleeve he’s been wearing, pictured above, that pays tribute to his native Hawaii and seeks to raise awareness of recovery efforts from the destruction caused by the erupting Mount Kilauea.

Goold:

[Wong] has been notified by Major League Baseball that he will face a fine if he continues to wear an unapproved sleeve that features Hawaiian emblem. Wong said he will stash the sleeve, like Jose Martinez had to do with his Venezuelan-flag sleeve, and find other ways to call attention to his home island.

Willson Contreras was likewise told to ditch his Venezuela sleeve.

None of these guys are being singled out, it seems. Rather, this is all part of a wider sweep Major League Baseball is making with respect to the uniformity of uniforms. As Goold notes at the end of his piece, however, MLB has no problem whatsoever with players wearing a non-uniform article of underclothing as long as it’s from an MLB corporate sponsor. Such as this sleeve worn by Marcell Ozuna, and supplied by Nike that, last I checked, were not in keeping with the traditional St. Louis Cardinals livery:

ST. LOUIS, MO – MAY 22: Marcell Ozuna #23 of the St. Louis Cardinals celebrates after recording his third hit of the game against the Kansas City Royals in the fifth inning at Busch Stadium on May 22, 2018 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)

If Nike was trying to get people to buy Hawaii or Venezuela compression sleeves, I’m sure there would be no issue here. They’re not, however, and it seems like creating awareness and support for people suffering from natural, political and humanitarian disasters do not impress the powers that be nearly as much.