Blue Jays GM: “This whole thing is stupid”

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So, Alex Anthopoulous is going the J.P. Arencibia route.

Mike Cormack of Sportsnet.ca has all of the quotes as the Blue Jays GM addressed the media Wednesday to respond to an ESPN story accusing the team of using someone in the center-field stands to steal signs.

Anthopoulous opened by saying, “This whole thing is stupid.  It’s unbelievable that we’re even sitting here.”

The general manager went on to accuse ESPN of failing to do its homework, and he said the story has a lot of holes in it.  He asked ESPN to find someone formerly connected with the Blue Jays to try to back the story up, and that ESPN either didn’t try to do so or failed to come up with a former player or employee willing to contribute to the story.

Meanwhile, the National Post’s John Lott got Jose Bautista to speak briefly.  Bautista said the encounter detailed within ESPN’s article happened during a White Sox game.  So add the White Sox to the list of teams, which includes the Red Sox and Yankees, that believe the Jays are cheating.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.