Charlie Manuel says Shane Victorino had to fight “unless he wants his teammates to call him chicken”

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Todd Zolecki of MLB.com got some good quotes about last night’s Phillies-Giants scuffle from Shane Victorino, Placido Polanco, and manager Charlie Manuel.

For starters, Manuel said that Victorino “almost has to” charge the mound when Ramon Ramirez plunked him “unless he wants his teammates to call him chicken” because “he hit Vic and then came off the mound at him … that’s the way baseball works. I’ve been playing for almost 50 years. He pretty much called him out.”

Victorino told Zolecki that he “absolutely” believes Ramirez intentionally hit him with the pitch that started it all, saying:

That’s why I took a step forward. I had no intentions of going out there and charging the mound. I just wanted to know why in that situation … he was around the plate all night and throughout that inning … obviously with two outs and I get up to the plate and the first pitch is at my back.

I just wanted to go out there and get an answer. I had no intentions of charging the mound. I did step forward. Obviously, Eli [Whiteside], I guess from looking at his reaction, thought I was going to go and he started jumping around. Obviously, Polanco came in and he tackled Polanco. I think everything escalated from there.

“I just wanted to go out there and get an answer” strikes me as a pretty hilarious explanation of Victorino’s reaction, but regardless of his initial intentions the decision to rush back into the scrum after being held back by various people, including an umpire, will almost surely get Victorino suspended by MLB. He explained that part by saying: “I just felt like Carlos [Ruiz] was in a position like I needed to go in and help him get away from everything.”

Meanwhile, Victorino saying that Eli Whiteside “tackled Polanco” didn’t sit well with Polanco, who told Zolecki: “He didn’t tackle me.” And he’s right, since Whiteside never actually got Polanco to the ground. I commented on Twitter at the time that Whiteside showed some good linebacker instincts, but on second thought he was acting more like a fullback making a lead block than a linebacker making a tackle. Either way, not bad for someone who looks like a middle-aged insurance salesman.

Victorino, Polanco, Ruiz, and Whiteside are all in the lineup for today’s game, which starts in a couple hours.

MLB, union resume blood testing after pandemic, lockout

Scott Taetsch-USA TODAY Sports
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NEW YORK – In the first acknowledgment that MLB and the players’ association resumed blood testing for human growth hormone, the organizations said none of the 1,027 samples taken during the 2022 season tested positive.

HGH testing stopped in 2021 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Testing also was halted during the 99-day lockout that ended in mid-March, and there were supply chain issues due to COVID-19 and additional caution in testing due to coronavirus protocols.

The annual public report is issued by Thomas M. Martin, independent program administrator of MLB’s joint drug prevention and treatment program. In an announcement accompanying Thursday’s report, MLB and the union said test processing is moving form the INRS Laboratory in Quebec, Canada, to the UCLA Laboratory in California.

MLB tests for HGH using dried blood spot testing, which was a change that was agreed to during bargaining last winter. There were far fewer samples taken in 2022 compared to 2019, when there were 2,287 samples were collected – none positive.

Beyond HGH testing, 9,011 urine samples were collected in the year ending with the 2022 World Series, up from 8,436 in the previous year but down from 9,332 in 2019. And therapeutic use exemptions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder dropped for the ninth straight year, with just 72 exemptions in 2022.

Overall, the league issued six suspensions in 2022 for performance-enhancing substances: three for Boldenone (outfielder/first baseman Danny Santana, pitcher Richard Rodriguez and infielder Jose Rondon, all free agents, for 80 games apiece); one each for Clomiphene (Milwaukee catcher Pedro Severino for 80 games), Clostebol (San Diego shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. for 80 games) and Stanozolol (Milwaukee pitcher J.C. Mejia for 80 games).

There was an additional positive test for the banned stimulant Clobenzorex. A first positive test for a banned stimulant results in follow-up testing with no suspension.