Rich Harden’s deal fell through over — wait for it — his medical records

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Seeing Rich Harden’s trade to the Red Sox go sideways late last night was rather surprising and rather odd, but now that we know the reason, it’s not that surprising after all:  the Red Sox called it off after looking at his medical records.

Shocking, I know. Here’s how WEEI’s Alex Speier reports it:

A review of medicals after an agreement on the parameters of the deal, according to a baseball source, led to uncertainty about what kind of contribution the Red Sox could expect from Harden down the stretch, and whether he would be able to make enough starts to justify the trade.

I’m sure that “because his medical records are as long as ‘War and Peace’ and as dense as ‘Ulysses’ thus no one in Boston could even get through them” had something to do with it too. They probably found sixteen types of fractures and strains that were heretofore unknown to medical science. I wouldn’t be shocked if there was also information suggesting that Harden has a vestigial twin or something. And that the vestigial twin is injured too.

Speier says that it is unlikely that talks between Boston and Oakland will resume, so this deal is more than mostly dead. It’s just dead.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.