Roger Clemens files his double jeopardy motion

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As we noted last week, Roger Clemens’ lawyers are going to try to argue that he can’t be re-tried because doing so would violate his constitutional right against the double jeopardy. He filed a motion to that effect today, arguing that the prosecutors — worried that they were losing —  intentionally introduced impermissible evidence for the sole purpose of getting a mistrial, and as such, should not be allowed to try him again.

Sort of like when your brother hit “reset” on the old Atari 2600 just when you were about to beat his high score.

This is kind of hard to take, though, because the trial was only in its second day.  And the first day was so mind-numbingly boring that if the prosecution really did completely bollocks up their case, no one else had really noticed it.

Nice try, and I suppose there’s a chance Clemens wins, but I kinda doubt it.

Mariners claim Kaleb Cowart off waivers from Angels

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The Mariners announced that the club claimed Kaleb Cowart off waivers from the Angels. Interestingly, the Mariners list Cowart as both an outfielder and a right-handed pitcher. Cowart has never pitched professionally, but the Mariners will try him as a two-way player next season, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Cowart was a highly regarded pitcher in high school.

Cowart, 26, has played all over the field, spending most of his time at third base and second base, but also logging a handful of innings at first base, shortstop, and left field.  He hasn’t hit much at all, owning a career .177/.241/.293 triple-slash line across 380 plate appearances in the big leagues. It makes sense to try another angle.

Shohei Ohtani, of course, is helping to popularize the rebirth of the two-way player. In his first year in the majors after having played in Japan for five years, Ohtani won the AL Rookie of the Year Award by posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances along with a 3.31 ERA over 10 starts. Don’t expect Cowart to hit those lofty numbers, but additional versatility could prolong his life in the majors.