Brad Penny downplays mound argument with Victor Martinez

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Brad Penny and Victor Martinez got into a heated argument on the mound in the middle of the fourth inning yesterday, with Penny being removed from the game a short time later after allowing seven runs in 3.1 innings against the Angels.

Martinez refused to speak about the situation afterward, but Penny downplayed the incident and said the disagreement was over his wanting to come to a set position while the catcher was giving signs:

It had nothing to do with pitch selection or anything like that. With a runner on second, I like to come set taking signs. That way the hitter can’t look at second base and anything there. I’ve pitched my whole career that way, and he didn’t want me to do it. I know there’s no other way for me. I guess it’s a habit. It’s natural. I’ve done it my whole career. It’s not that big of a deal. Me and Victor have been friends for a while now, and that happens when you’re competing.

Martinez declining to talk about it suggests he thinks the argument was a bit more serious, but as Penny notes they worked together with the Red Sox in 2009 and have teamed up for eight starts this season. Prior to yesterday’s disaster outing Penny had a 4.52 ERA with Martinez catching him and liked working with the catcher enough to effusively praise him to the media back in February:

What I liked about Victor is he was never negative in any way. If you’re struggling and he comes out to the mound and talks to you, it’s all positive. I mean, you can see he just knows you’re going to get out of it and do good. You can see it in his eyes. I mean, like I said before, what a great teammate. You guys are going to be really impressed with him as a person, not only as a player.

Martinez is “never negative in any way” and if “he comes out to the mound and talks to you it’s all positive.” Except yesterday, when he started yelling at Penny while walking out from behind the plate and was so upset that he wouldn’t even address the incident with reporters. But other than that, all positive!

Penny and Martinez hadn’t been paired up since June 26 and something tells me it might be more than a month before they work together again.

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.