The Red Sox are “very concerned” about Clay Buchholz

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Alex Speier of WEEI.com reports that the Red Sox are “very concerned” that Clay Buchholz is dealing with a structural issue in his back — perhaps a broken bone as opposed to the muscle strain currently listed as what’s ailing him —  and may not be back any time soon.

This is trouble, and may intensify the Sox’ quest to land an arm.  There has been talk about Ubaldo Jimenez, but the price is probably still pretty high.  Given that Boston has a three game lead in the East and a very comfortable cushion over the next best wild card contender behind the Yankees, it’s probably not the time to do something silly.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.