Horacio Ramirez resurfaces in majors with Angels

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The Angels demoted reliever Michael Kohn and replaced him with journeyman lefty Horacio Ramirez prior to Wednesday’s game, bringing the former Brave back to the majors for the first time in two years.

Ramirez was last seen with the Royals in 2009.  Despite a horrible March, he was named the team’s fifth starter out of spring training that year — Dayton Moore and company badly wanted a left-handed starter in the rotation — only to get demoted after one start.  He had a 5.96 ERA in 22 2/3 innings that season before getting cut in June.

Ramirez debuted in the Braves in 2003, going 12-4 with a 4.00 ERA as a rookie.  After four seasons in Atlanta, he was famously traded to Seattle for Rafael Soriano, a deal that was so clearly awful at the time that it still manages to standout in Bill Bavasi’s disastrous tenure as Mariners GM.  Ramirez didn’t even last the season in Seattle as he racked up as 7.16 ERA in 20 starts.  Since leaving Atlanta, he has a 6.32 ERA in 158 innings as a major leaguer.

Now he’s back after going 3-1 with a 3.47 ERA as a reliever for Triple-A Salt Lake.  Lefties hit just .222 off him in 63 at-bats, so he’ll get a quick look before the Angels decide whether they need to pick up another southpaw before the deadline.

Video: Austin Hedges gets a homer with an alley-oop assist from Mallex Smith

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The Padres’ Austin Hedges hit a fun home run in last night’s game against the Mariners.

He was facing M’s reliever Cory Gearrin with two outs in the sixth and drove one to deep right center. Padres outfielder Mallex Smith ranged back, leapt — though he didn’t have to — the ball doinked off his glove, and went over the fence for an alley-oop homer.

The best part was Hedges chuckling and, I think anyway, kinda tipping his cap to Smith. For his part, Smith sat on the ground and looked rather disgusted about it all. Which, you can’t really blame him:

It was the second time in three days such a homer was hit. On Sunday Dexter Fowler did the same courtesy to Noah Syndergaard.

Now, can someone tell me why these aren’t four-base errors? There’s probably a reason but, really, there’s no way these were dingers without the unintended help of the outfielder.