Baseball game as symphony

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This is neat.  I’m surprised I’m reading this in the New York Times instead of hearing it on some longish NPR segment, but it’s neat anyway.  Anthony Tommasini, chief music critic of the Times, describes a day at Yankee Stadium — a week ago Sunday, in fact — from an aural point of view, as though the game itself and all of the surrounding noise was a symphony of sorts:

For all the hubbub of constant sound it is amazing how clearly the crack of a bat, the whoosh of a pitch (at least from the powerhouse Sabathia), and the leathery thud of the ball smothered in the catcher’s mitt cut through the textures. And if the hum of chattering provides the unbroken timeline and undulant ripple of this baseball symphony, the voices that break through from all around are like striking, if fleeting, solo instruments.

That passage may sound a bit over-the-top, but it’s a really great column overall.

I don’t go to nearly as many baseball games as a lot of you, so maybe I’m just more sensitive to it, but I always take a few minutes to simply listen to it all, often with my eyes closed, so I get exactly what Tommasini is going on about.

Red Sox to activate Dustin Pedroia from disabled list on Friday

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Manager Alex Cora said that second baseman Dustin Pedroia will be activated from the disabled list on Friday, Pete Abraham of The Boston Globe reports.

Pedroia, 34, had cartilage restoration surgery on his left knee in late October. He played in only 105 games last season, batting .293/.369/.392 with seven home runs and 62 RBI in 463 plate appearances. His offensive stats were his worst since an abnormally-bad 2014 campaign.

The 34-15 Red Sox have baseball’s best record. Eduardo Nunez has mostly been handling second base in Pedroia’s place, hitting a disappointing .243/.261/.361 in 177 trips to the plate. He has also, by most metrics, played subpar defense at the position, so getting Pedroia back will be a boon.